Mystery Photo Answer: Where’s Sam

Did you find Samuel Boardman?  Tucked off to the left of the towering trees?  Congratulations to all of you who did!

Sam Boardman

Samuel H. Boardman, Oregon State Park’s first Park Superintendent, exploring Silver Falls State Park in 1941.

This photo was taken at Silver Falls State Park while Boardman was scouting for an amphitheater site.  More than one site was proposed, so we are not entirely sure where this spot is within the park.

Boardman Files at State Archives

For boxes of Boardman files were donated by Oregon State Parks to the Oregon State Archives so that they would be available to the public.

Boadman's Masterpices

Boardman’s finest writings are compiled in folders simply called “Masterpieces.”

 

Stay tuned for an update in April after we at second time with Sam’s relatives.  Meanwhile, if you’d like to learn more, Oregon State Archives in Salem has boxes of Boardman documents for your reading pleasure!

 

Mystery Photo: Where’s Sam?

Much has happened since my last post about Oregon’s first State Park Superintendent, Samuel H. Boardman.  On Friday, few of us from Oregon State Parks had the honor of meeting with the granddaughter and great-granddaughter of Samuel Boardman.  Over a cup of coffee, they shared stories, books, photos, letters, and newspaper articles about Sam.

We were star-struck to say the least are planning to meet again to record some of the Boardman family’s stories.  And in preparation for the next get-together, we have been digging through the Oregon State Park archives to find interesting items to share with Sam’s relatives.

Forest Panorama with Samuel H. Boardman

Do you see Oregon’s first State Parks Superintendent, Samuel Boardman?  Can you figure out which park this is?

Yesterday, I found a gigantic photo file and let my computer work on it overnight.  I arrived this morning to find this photo of Sam Boardman.  At first I thought it must have been a mistake.  Where was Sam?  It took me a minute, but I assure you that he is there.  Here is your challenge:

 

Part One:  Find Sam in the photo.

But don’t tell us yet!  Let others try, too.

 

Part Two:  Take a guess at where the photo was taken.

Hints:  This forest panorama was taken at a proposed amphitheater site.  The park has an amphitheater today, as well as a campground — something Sam never allowed during his tenure at State Parks.  Sam was very influential in acquiring and developing this inland (not coastal!) park.

 

Can you tell us where Sam is?

 

An Ode to Sam Boardman

We have all been asked the question before.  “If you could have dinner with a famous person (dead or alive), who would it be?”  Over the holidays, we were sitting around with friends, and someone pulled out a “TableTopics” conversation starter game.  The dinner question was the first one.

Oregon State Highway Commission at Vista House_Sam Boardman

The Oregon State Highway Commission at Vista House. Sam Boardman is third from the right. 1943.



My mind raced just like yours might be now.  Robin Williams, my favorite actor.  Teddy Roosevelt, my favorite conservationist President.  John Muir, my favorite West Coast naturalist.  Sigurd Olson, my favorite Northwoods naturalist.  My grandmother, who passed when I was in elementary school.  I thought for a moment.  Samuel Boardman.  I would like to have lunch with our very own Sam Boardman.

Samuel H. Boardman was the first Parks Superintendent for Oregon State Parks.  He was around for the birth of our Oregon State Park system, and our system grew mightily under his watch.  (Between 1929 and 1950, Oregon State Parks blossomed from 46 to 181 park properties with acreage swelling from 4,000 to 66,000 acres.)  As charismatic as Robin Williams, as passionate about conservation as Roosevelt, with the heart of a naturalist, and the wisdom of a grandparent, what I wouldn’t give to be in presence of “the father of the Oregon State Parks system.”

I fell in love with Samuel Boardman while working at Silver Falls State Park.  Early on, I found in the park archives a lengthy letter dated November 1951 from Sam to his successor, Chester H. Armstrong about the history and future of Silver Falls.  I read, reread, highlighted, and read to others my favorite passages in this letter.

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Samuel H. Boardman. Oregon State Parks Superintendent from 1929 to 1950.

Most memorable for me was the two entire pages Sam took justify the need for a “carving unit” at Silver Falls—a wonderfully colorful, poetic, and passionate piece with the gist of the argument being that humans have an innate need to carve—and rather than have them desecrate restrooms, picnic tables, and trees, we should designate a place for them to do so.  Further, Boardman believed that such a project for open, rather than covert, carving could actually be shocking enough to change a person’s ways:

To make people think, you must jolt them.  Can’t you see the carriage of this lesson of preservation lingering with the visitor throughout the day, after he has stood before this shrine of destruction?  Can’t you see this same conservationist, after imbibing his entry lesson, stepping up to some carving vandal and requesting him to desist?

Somewhere, somehow, the lesson of preservation must be put over to the American people.  Somewhere a start has to be made.  If through a log, a privy, then so be it.  If you know of a better way of preachment, the house tops are yours for the asking.  This merits your deepest consideration for an American principle of “To have and to hold” is at stake.

It seems like too small of a detail to even mention, but Boardman was passionate about all aspects of parks and the preservation of them.  He touches all in his letter, leaving Armstrong with these final thoughts:  “A recreational kingdom is placed in your hand.  Build unto it.  Guard that which has been [built].”

Upper Latourell with Bridge

Upper Latourell Falls in the early 1900s when there was a bridge across the middle of the falls. OSU Digital Archives.

In other letters and essays, Boardman writes about the Columbia River Gorge.   A place, no doubt, near and dear to him as he was the founder of the town of Boardman at the east end of the Gorge.  It was at Latourell Falls that Boardman learned what would to him prove to be one of his most valuable lessons.  Guy Talbot State Park has two waterfalls.  Latourell Falls—easily seen from the highway—and Upper Latourell Falls—only visible by trail.  The upper falls is a double fall (having a whirlpool in the center), and Samuel Boardman thought it a good idea to build a trail in the middle “where the hiker could stand between the two falls.”  And so, Boardman blasted in a trail.  And the result was, in his mind, awful:

The very foundation upon which depending the beauty of the entire picture has a great gash across it.  The aesthetic sense of the individual curdled before reaching the beauty spot.  …  [The experience] taught me that man’s hand in the alteration of the Design of the Great Architect is egotistic, tragic, ignorant.  …  From then on, I became the protector of the blade of grass, the flower on the sward, the fern, the shrub, the tree, the forest.  …  I found man could not alter without disfigurement.  Take away, disfigure, and you deaden the beat of a soul.  (Oregon State Park System:  A Brief History.  Samuel Boardman.)

Upper Latourell_St. Andrews

Upper Latourell Falls today, largely unmarred with vegetation hiding scarring from Boardman’s attempted trail.

For those familiar with the Columbia River Gorge, the above might sound a bit familiar.  Samuel Lancaster, who designed the Historic Columbia River Highway, is quoted saying something similar about planning and building the road:

When I made my preliminary survey here and found myself standing waist-deep in the ferns, I remember my mother’s long-ago warning, ‘Oh, Samuel, do be careful of my Boston fern!  …  And I then pledged myself that none of this wild beauty should be marred where it could be prevented.  The highway was built so that not one tree was felled, not one fern was crushed, unnecessarily.  (The Columbia:  America’s Great Highway.  Samuel Lancaster.)

Samuel_C_Lancaster_Plaque_Crown_Point_Oregon

Samuel Lancaster designed the Historic Columbia River Highway about a decade before Samuel Boardman became Oregon State Parks first Superintendent.

You can read a large collection of Sam Boardman’s essays by reading his book, Oregon State Park System:  A Brief History, available online through the Oregon State University Library.  Although, I must mention that I noticed by comparing Sam’s November 1951 letter to Armstrong about Silver Falls to the same section in the book, that book is a meticulously edited version of his original writing—the overall content is the same and reads seamlessly, but some of Sam’s quick wit and humorous storytelling is, at times, watered down or missing altogether.  I can only imagine how every other essay must have read before the editors made their marks!  How I would love to sit down with Sam and ask the man, himself!

I will link to the book here and leave you with an excerpt of the book’s last paragraph, written about (you guessed it) the Columbia River Gorge.

http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/1957/9271/Ore_Sta_Par_Sys.pdf?sequence=1

The Gorge has so many stops and goes, unscored notes, so many varied choruses that it could be blended into a symphony.  …  The woodwinds in the swaying tree tops.  The flutes in the mist of the waterfalls.  The bases in the steady roar of wayward gales.  The Rhine lives in the historical music composed through the centuries.  There must be a composer who could blend the mists, lights, caprices, the songs of the waterfalls, the ripples of the brooks, the sonnets from the tree tops, the boldness of the cliffs into a symphony of the Columbia Gorge that will live in the souls of the generations to come.  It is a challenge to Destiny to give birth to a maestro.  Who will write a score that will make the Gorge musically unforgettable through the centuries?

“Wild” for the Gorge: Upcoming PCT Talk

As many of you have heard, Cheryl Strayed’s popular book Wild about the author’s journey on the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) is coming out in movie-form on December 5, 2014.  What does this have to do with the Gorge and Oregon State Parks?  Well, as it turns out, quite a bit.

 

WILD_movie_poster

“Wild” comes to movie theaters on December 5, 2014. Look for shots filmed in the Gorge!

 

Wild Book

Cheryl Strayed’s book “Wild” is about her personal journey on the Pacific Crest Trail.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First, Strayed completed her hike of the PCT at our very own Cascade Locks in the Columbia River Gorge.  The Bridge of the Gods is the PCT route’s through the Gorge.

Second, it is a little known fact that Oregon State Parks manages the Cascade Locks Trail Head right under the bridge.  And although it is not officially part of the PCT, many thru-hikers take the Eagle Creek canyon route to get to the Gorge — completing their final miles by walking the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail to Cascade Locks.

Bridge of the gods trailhead

The Cascade Locks Trail Head — PCT thru-hikers pass through here en masse between the end of August and the beginning of September each year.  It also happens to be a lovely spot for a view of the Bridge of the Gods and the Columbia River.

 

Third, parts of Wild were shot in the Columbia River Gorge.  If you thought you spied Reese Witherspoon in the Gorge last fall, you just might have.

 

PCTA Wild Article

The Pacific Crest Trail Association has a new “Wild” webpage — along with resources, it features essays written by thru-hikers.  In this essay, I shared the aftermath of my trek.

http://www.pcta.org/wild/

 

And finally, in 2012, I took a leave of absence from Oregon State Parks to hike the Pacific Crest Trail.  I started on April 30, 2012 and finished on September 27, 2012.  151 days, 2660 miles, more than 6 million steps.  And this coming Thanksgiving weekend, I am going to share my story here in the Gorge.

 

Bridge of the Gods

I completed Oregon, passed into Washington, Canada-bound on September 3, 2012.

 

Please join me for a talk on the Pacific Crest Trail, “The Good, the Bad, and the Unforgettable” on Sunday, November 30, 2014 at 2 PM at the Bonneville Lock and Dam, Bradford Visitor Center.

 

PCT Talk Flyer_Bonneville Dam

In 2012, I took a leave of absence from Oregon State Parks  to hike the Pacific Crest Trail . . . this coming Thanksgiving weekend, I am going to share my story . . .

Ice Ice Baby

For those of you who have wisely chosen to stay away this past week while the Gorge pounded out its first windy ice storm of the season, I thought we’d share a whip of the tempest.

Ice in the Parking Log

The sun’s reflection on the ice that coats Rooster Rock’s parking lot.

 

FullSizeRender

The effect of that ice.  An accident on I-84 that sent rangers scurrying home.

 

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Weather changes quickly in the Gorge. On November 7, our big leaf maples looked like this.

 

Snow and Maple Leaf

By the following week, the trees sat naked, leaves lodged in snow.

 

Ice on Cliff

Icicles form at water seeps along the Columbia River Highway.

 

Shepperd's Dell and Bridge

Trails and bridges are coated with ice . . . and will be slow to thaw in the shadows of the Gorge walls.  This is a look at Shepperd’s Dell.

 

Shepperd's Dell

Shepperd’s Dell hourglass waterfall.

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The trail at Latourell is closed due to ice, but you can still admire the contrast of the icy falls and the glowing lichen from the lower viewpoint.

 

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When I arrived at Multnomah Falls (not a State Park, but a flagship of the Gorge), two visitors were beyond the fence at the lower pool side (not permitted).  While there are many reasons waterfall pools are closed, it is especially dangerous in the winter — water seeps into cracks between columns of basalt rock and then expands when it freezes . . . peeling off slabs of rock and sending them flying onto whatever lies below.

 

Haunted (Vista) House

October at the Vista House is always an interesting month . . .

From the shift in weather and beginning of the winter winds, to the outside weather (rain) making its way inside, to the shorter hours that the building is open, everything changes.  And this last change, being closed more often to the public, means that the local “residents” of Vista House have more time to be in their building alone.   Besides the mice, one of these local residents is (I believe) the ghost of the building’s architect, Edgar M. Lazarus.

Vista House_Haunted

Who resides at Vista House when all of the visitors go home?



Many staff who have worked in Vista House late night in the fall have reported feeling the presence of Lazarus.  I have felt it before, too.  However, I have never been scared of it.  It is a nice, almost nurturing, presence to me.  I feel that he is just there watching over his building.  Happy that we are there, too, keeping watch and taking care—which is why I think I don’t find it scary.  If I was causing damage at Vista House, it might be a different story.

One of the ways Edgar Lazarus makes himself known (other than just the “feeling” that he is there) is by playing with the elevator or “lift.”  The lift is situated in the basement level of Vista House—volunteers in the rotunda level push toggles and buttons to raise and lower the lift.  The control box at the main level desk is the only way to operate the lift.  That said, I have had times when the lift is completely powered off, I am in the building by myself in the hallway in the basement when the lift door will start to open and close.  Or times when I’m upstairs and can hear the lift door opening and closing even though I can see with my own eyes that no one’s hands are on the control.  At times, it is just the outside door opening and closing; at other times, both the inside and outside door start opening and closing.

Lazarus_portrait

Vista House architect, Edgar M. Lazarus.

I have always attributed this lift movement to Lazarus.  When the renovations were made on Vista House in 2004, we kept everything original (or at least as originally designed) EXCEPT the addition of the ADA elevator or “lift.”  This was the only “modern” addition to the building.  I do not think that Lazarus is upset by the lift, more than he is interested in it.  I think Lazarus, being an architect with a quizzical mind, is intrigued by the lift—curious about how it works—and that he is simply playing with it.

I had always attributed the change in the temperature/weather as the sign that strange-ness was coming to Vista House.  However, upon further research, I recently found out that Edgar M. Lazarus died on October 2, 1939 after a bitter dispute over his fees for the design and construction of Vista House.

Is it just a coincidence that Vista House’s ghost-play starts in October?

Or does the spirit of Edgar M. Lazarus begin making his rounds each year on the day he died, taking up residence in Vista House—the building he is best known for and one he felt he was never fully paid for?

 

(Special thanks to Ranger Mo Czinger for this ghostly account.)

Mystery Photo Answer

Did you figure out last week’s mystery image?  Do you still have a few questions?

Before I reveal the answer, let me show you two more photos and give you a few more hints.

 

IMG_1243

Material Hint: Look closely at the mid-right section of this photo. See the (dangerous) piece of flair woven into the object? It should help you reel in the answer.

 

IMG_1247

Object Hint: Take a peak inside this object — it has a soft lining of moss and lichen.

A few other things to mention:

  • This was found after ranger fell a hazard tree near Benson Lake — Benson is located near Multnomah Falls, between the Historic Columbia River Highway and I-84.  There is a lake, a pond, a creek, and the Columbia River nearby.
  • It was hanging suspended from a cottonwood tree branch about 20 feet up.
  • The dimensions of the object are 3 1/2″ wide by  5 1/2″ long.

Ready for the answer?!

Okay, here it is:  . . . We do not know.

That’s right.  We do not know.  Well, not everything at least.  We know that it is a bird’s nest.  And we know that it is constructed of fishing line and lined with moss, lichen, and a strand of carpet.  What we are not 100% certain of is its maker.  Our first three initial guesses out of the birds who weave nests were wren, bushtit, or oriole.  Bushtit nests look more like long hanging socks.  And while some wrens weave nests, the wrens in the Gorge are not great weavers, and this nest is a piece of art.

Our best guess for the maker of this nest is the Bullock’s Oriole.  These are common at Benson; they often nest in cottonwood trees near streams and waterways; they are marvelous weavers of hanging basket nests; and they’ll use hair, twine, or grass for a nest (or perhaps fishing line!)  Our only hesitation is that the nest seems a bit small for this medium-sized bird.  A quick search reports that the average Bullock’s Oriole nest is 4 inches wide and 6 inches deep — our is 1/2″ shy of each of those.  So it may be a smaller Bullock’s nest.  Or it may not.

And this is how naturalist studies often go.  A definitive answer is not always possible.  More research is often required.  And not the kind that is found on the Web or in a book.  No, the best research here will be done at Benson State Recreation Area during the Bullock’s mating season.

So, I’ll see you at Benson between this coming May and mid-July!

 

 

Mystery Photo Challenge: What Is This?

A few of the Gorge rangers were out at Benson State Recreation Area yesterday and found this gem.

Questions for the readers:

  • What is this?
  • What is it made of?
  • Who made it?
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View from the front.

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Close-up of the material.

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Object with a large paperclip for a size reference.

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Profile.

 

Post your best guesses in the comments field below, and we’ll get back to you next week with the answer!

The Beach Is Back

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A sandy Gorge beach awaits you at Rooster Rock.

The beach is BACK . . .

. . . And it’s free of rubble

(Hey-la-hey-la the beach is back)

We see it wavin’ better come out on the double

(Hey-la-hey-la the beach is back)

The wind has died down and the sky is mostly blue

(Hey-la-hey-la the beach is back)

So come out now ’cause it’s quite a view

(Hey-la-hey-la the beach is back)

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Kiteboarders enjoy bounding from shore to shore in early season winds this year.

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Meanwhile, windsurfers take their chance to perform a river dance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s true; the beach is back at Rooster Rock State Park.

As many of you know, Rooster Rock used to be the place to go for sandy river-level picnics, sandcastles, and swims—but things have changed over the years beginning with the floods of 1996 that swept massive amounts of beach downriver.  Today, a wide, rambling shoreline is a rarity.  And the perfect wind and weather window is now.  So, if you get a chance, take a drive out to exit 25, and enjoy the sand between your toes while it’s here and while it’s warm.

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Turkey Vultures are the custodians of the beach – -here, they clean up a carp carcass.

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A Great Blue Heron finds a lunchtime snack along the pole dikes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wondering what the beach used to look like?  Take a peek!

 

RoosterRockParking2

Rooster Rock’s parking, c.1960.  Check out those cars!

RoosterRockUmbrella2

Rooster Rock’s beach, c.1960.  Note the clothing and hairstyles.

RoosterRockShore

Rooster Rock’s beach-goers, c.1960.  Imagine your family here!

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Hope to see you here soon!

 

Gifts to Vista House

Within a few weeks of beginning my new position in the Gorge, I received a phone call.  It was Ms. Julianna Guy calling from Bellingham, Washington.  Julianna had a special request.  She was 87 years old, and before she died, she wanted to see a plaque at Vista House recognizing her father.

Vista House on Crown Point_Grey Day

What if no one had donated land for all of us at Crown Point?

Julianna’s grandparents were Dr. and Mrs. Osmon Royal, and they had owned acreage at Crown Point (the site of Vista House) when they passed, in 1910 and 1912, respectively.  An only child, Julianna’s father, Osmon Royal II, inherited the land from his parents.

Soon after, the City of Portland approached Mr. Royal about donating the land, and on November 2, 1914, Osmon Royall II along with three others gave land at Crown Point, each for the sum of “One Dollar … in consideration of the public good and benefit … for park purposes …”  Osmon Royal II was just 22 when he made the commitment.

Although Julianna’s father passed when she was 10 years old, she said that her mother, Carolyn Merritt Royal, told her children of their father’s “donation and of the love they both had for Mt. Hood, Crown Point … and of their courtship on the hiking trails of the area.”

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Without Vista House at Crown Point, over a million visitors a year would miss out on this view of the Columbia River Gorge.

Today, nearly 100 years later, a plaque hangs in the recognition hall in the lower level of Vista House.  It recognizes a total of eight land donors:  November 2, 1914 — Lorens Lund, Mari Lund, Osmon Royal II, George B. Van Waters; January 16, 1915 — Sarah M. Cornell, Ivan R. Cornell, Edward C. Cornell, Maud Cornell.  On July 27, 2014, Julianna Guy and twenty-six of her and Osmon Royal II’s relatives will travel to Vista House to see the plaque and pay tribute to their ancestor.  And with the date nearing, I thought we all should, too.

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Nearly 100 years ago, eight individuals generously donated land for Vista House at Crown Point.

Countless individuals and groups have contributed to the Vista House that we see today.  Some, like Osmon Royal II, donated land.  Some, like Vista House visitors, have donated money.  Others, like the Friends of Vista House volunteers, donate time.  All are invaluable.

So the next time you are at Vista House, I encourage you to visit the recognition hall.  To stop, read names of the 320-plus donors, and consider what Vista House must have meant to each.  And, then, perhaps, what it means to you.


 

DO YOU KNOW RELATIVES of land donors Lorens Lund, Mari Lund, Osmon Royal II, George B. Van Waters, Sarah M. Cornell, Ivan R. Cornell, Edward C. Cornell, or Maud Cornell?  They are invited to meet the extended family of Osmon Royal II at Vista House on Sunday, July 27, 2014 between 10 and 11 AM (exact time TBD by the Royal family).

 


 

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