2014 Gorge Resolutions: Choose Your Own Adventure

Well, it is a new year.  2014 has arrived.  And it is time (nearly past time) for the year’s resolutions.  Typically, resolve means to “settle or find a solution to (a problem or contentious matter).”  If you’re like me, your resolutions tend to be the same . . . and tend not to work.  So, a few years back, I went for the other definition of resolve, to “decide firmly on a course of action.” I switched from problem-solving to goal-setting.  And this year, it is all about the Columbia River Gorge. 

Want to join me?  Below is the result of my brainstorm.  Choose 10!  Or 20.  Or 30.  Feeling like a “Big Year”?  Go for all 50.  It’s time to choose your own 2014 adventure.

50 Things to Do In the Columbia River Gorge in 2014

  1. Hike 100 miles of different trails in the CRG.
  2. Visit all State Parks in the CRG.
  3. Visit 25 waterfalls in the CRG (there are over 90), at least one of each type (plunge, horsetail, fan, cascade, punchbowl, block, tier, and segmented).

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    Have you been to this waterfall?   Or talked to this ranger?  #3 and #39.

  4. Visit one Washington and one Oregon museum in the Gorge.
  5. Tour the Lewis and Clark sites along the CRG.

    IMG_0024

    Did you know?  Rooster Rock is a Lewis & Clark site.  #5.  Check.

  6. Visit a fish hatchery.
  7. Conduct your own naturalist study—visit and document changes at one spot 20 times throughout the year.
  8. Have a “three-pronged” adventure day (bike, hike, camp, windsurf, kiteboard, standup paddleboard, bird watch, fish, swim, paddle, disc golf, rock climb . . .just pick three!)
  9. Drive (and/or bike!) all existing portions of the Historic Columbia River Highway.
  10. View the Gorge from the water.
  11. Hike to the highest point in the Gorge.
  12. Read the journals of Lewis and Clark.
  13. Watch a documentary on the Gorge OR a movie filmed in the Gorge.

    IMG_0056

    If you’re up early enough for #18, you might see this flying saucer!

  14. Learn 10 new Gorge plants.  Photograph and sketch them.  Note their habitat.
  15. Learn 10 new Gorge birds.  Sketch them and learn their songs and calls.  Note their habitat.
  16. Go on a search for the rare Larch Mountain Salamander.
  17. Go on a search for the rare wildflower, Columbia Kittentails (Synthyris stellata)—only found in the Gorge.
  18. Hike to a viewpoint for a Gorge sunrise.
  19. Give back by volunteering for a day trail work, invasive weed removal, or litter cleanup in the Gorge.
  20. Stay a night in the Gorge.
  21. Attend a guided hike or educational program about the Gorge.
  22. Visit one Oregon Trail historical site.
  23. Visit one Native American petroglyph or pictograph.
  24. Find the work of the Civilian Conservation Corps in the Gorge.
  25. Study the Missoula Floods, who was Bretz?
  26. Walk through an oak grove in the Gorge.
  27. Stand in a waterfall “mist zone.”
  28. Hear the distinctive warning call or “whistle” of a pika.
  29. Sketch a plant using the “macro” point of view.
  30. Sketch the Gorge landscape from a viewpoint.
  31. Track wildlife prints on the beach.
  32. Write a letter and drop it off at the Bridal Veil Post Office.

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    This tunnel on the Historic Columbia River Highway is only accessible by foot or by bike. Go for #40 and #9!

  33. Hug an old-growth tree.
  34. Visit the site of a sawmill or fish cannery.
  35. Step foot on the Pacific Crest Trail.
  36. Learn the legend and geological story behind the Bridge of the Gods.
  37. Research historic photos of Celilo Falls, visit the site and imagine the power of the falls.
  38. Hike to a viewpoint where you can take in both Mount Hood and Mount Adams.
  39. Talk to a park ranger.
  40. Ride your bike on a section of the Historic Columbia River Hwy.
  41. Photograph the basalt columnar joints common in the Gorge—dark, six-sided, regular columns.
  42. Watch the Tundra Swans at Rooster Rock’s Mirror Lake in the winter.
  43. Look for petrified wood near Eagle Creek.
  44. Dip your fingers in either end of the Gorge—at the Sandy and Deschutes Rivers.
  45. Spot an Amtrak train passing through on the Washington side.
  46. Watch the salmon run.
  47. Watch the dam locks give a boat passage.
  48. Watch the moon rise over the Gorge.
  49. Stargaze in the Gorge.
  50. Share the Gorge with a friend

Phew!  It is going to be a busy year.  Best get started.  Worried about finishing?  #51 is “Find Bigfoot.”

IMG_2660

Finish them all? Time for #51. Track Bigfoot!

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Posted on January 11, 2014, in Cultural History, Plants & Wildlife, Programs & Events, Visiting the Gorge and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 8 Comments.

  1. 52. Read a book about the construction of the Columbia River Highway.

  2. Great encouragement for us Vista House volunteers with loads of ways to increase our knowledge. Wonderful start of your work with us! Thanks!!

    • Thanks, Claudia! I am looking forward to tackling as many as possible to get to know the Gorge as well as possible. I’m sure you recognized the spaceship . . . it’s very bright with our new lights!

      • One more comment – ahhh, that would be a no, I did not figure that out until you gave me this hint. Oh the shame of not catching it on my own!

      • Well, you have to be out pre-dawn to catch that one! Not too many volunteer shifts at that hour. 🙂

  3. Wonderful list! I can’t wait to get started.

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